Community. Integrity. Perseverance.

December 5: School starts 2 hours late
Due to slick, icy roads, Gladstone Schools will open 2 hours late on Monday, December 5. There is no morning Extended Day program. School buses will pick up 2 hours later than usual.

Kraxberger adds Technology electives
The STEAM classroom at Kraxberger Middle School is busy. The sound of buzzers, static, a 3D printer, and musical tones permeate the room, where lights flash and remote-controlled vehicles zip around the space. Here sixth graders are inventors, hard at work designing rovers, music speakers, flashlights, and doorbells through trial and error.

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math, the foundation of many high-demand, high-wage careers. The STEAM course and a class in coding for seventh and eighth graders were made possible by the school’s shift to a seven-period day, increasing elective options for students.

After creating electronics inventions, STEAM students will move through a mix of high tech and low tech projects, creating candle-powered boats, foam gliders, balsa wood airplanes, and rockets. They will also experiment with Sphero robots, 3-D printers, and gardening in the school courtyard.
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Kraxberger expands school clubs, sports
Kraxberger Middle School has launched a wide array of after school options for students. The goal is helping kids engage in their school community and make friends who share their interests.

To find out more about Kraxberger’s after school programs, contact Kraxberger secretary Nohemi Saldana at saldanan@gladstone.k12.or.us or call 503.655.3636. Options this fall include Dungeons and Dragons, Spanish, Drama, Cross Country, and Intramural Volleyball, as well as Yoga, the Gearheads Robotics Club, Electronics Recycling, and the Student Advocating for Equity [SAFE]. A late bus is provided.
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7th graders explore archaeology
Seventh graders in Amy Otto’s social studies class learned archeology through a project called Artifacts through the Ages, discovering how historic artifacts can inform us about cultures of the past.

“Students did Internet research on artifacts from ancient civilizations, then created their own artifact from clay based on a real artifact they studied,” said Otto. “Next they prepared a presentation that served as a digital museum of artifacts from their chosen civilization and shared it with students from other classes.”

Research ranged from ancient Japanese and Aztec cultures to the Greeks and Romans. The project-based learning approach is a strategy Kraxberger is using as a way to boost student engagement in learning.

Parks Young chose to study Japanese artifacts. “I learned about all of the artwork they have excavated over time and how it can really teach us about their culture,” he said.