Gladstone District News

87% of GHS students take Career/Technical courses
At Gladstone High School, 87% of students take career/technical [CTEC] classes before graduation. That’s 13% above the state average, and also significantly higher than all neighboring districts, The CTEC Consortium study compiled enrollment from three cohort years from 2017 to 2020. The data can be found here: https://gladstonekids.com/CTEC

“Gladstone’s CTEC classes range from medical terminology, construction technology, and video production to accounting, engineering, and cyber security,” said Principal Kevin Taylor. “Beyond that, we also offer many AP, dual-credit and CCC classes to prepare students for college.
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Gladstone District tops state graduation rate by 5%
The Gladstone School District’s four-year graduation rate for the class of 2021 was 86%. That’s 5% above the state graduation rate.

Gladstone again showed strong performance by some historically underserved groups. More than 86% of Hispanic/Latino students graduated in four years, beating the state average by over 4%. Nearly 82% of Gladstone’s economically disadvantaged students graduated on time, a rate nearly 5% better than the state average. In Gladstone, over 78% of students with disabilities graduated on time, almost 7% more than the previous year and 12% above the state average.
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Gladstone’s hospital-quality air standards a first for Oregon schools
In April, the Gladstone School District completed installation of UV-C technology in all school ventilation systems. The technology is 99.97% effective in cleaning air for viruses and bacteria, including COVID-19 and influenza.

“This is a groundbreaking project,” said Facilities Manager Ryan Johnson. “We are excited to be the first school district in Oregon to improve school air quality to hospital standards.”

The UV-C technology works by using ultraviolet germicidal lamps in the airflow system, a highly effective method of destroying microorganisms. The cost of the project is covered by federal funds for upgrades needed due to COVID-19. The project took longer to complete than expected due to supply-chain issues, but the majority of work was done before the omicron surge.